Skipping Hearts, Arrhythmia Support Forums

Comments posted by users on this Website are made by individuals and reflect the userís personal opinions and NOT those of Skipping Hearts. You should not act on any advice or opinion posted on this Website. Instead, always check with your physician before taking any action as it pertains to your health. Skipping Hearts makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, regarding the use or the results of this Website in terms of its correctness, accuracy, reliability, or otherwise. Skipping Hearts does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, opinions, or other information that may be mentioned on the Website.
Join us!
We're a community of people with arrhythmias, providing knowledge, friendship and support as we all learn to manage and cope with and even settle our palpitating hearts. Joining the community is free, quick and easy. Help is just a few minutes away...
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 07-15-2009, 04:51 PM
Casper664's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wisconsin!
Posts: 73
Journal Entries: 1
Casper664 is on a distinguished road
Exercise and stronger PVC's/PAC's

Hey! Wondering if any of you notice that when you work out your PVC's/PAC's seem stronger. Not neccessarily more..I think I only have 3-4 duing a 30 min workout...but they are STRONG! feel like a kick in the chest...these are the scariest feeling ones. I know through research ive found that most people notice a decrease in frequency during excercise, but mine seem to still be there..just at a higher intensity it seems. Any ideas why? is it b.c my blood is just pumping more blood, so when the blood pools, theres that much more to get out with that next beat? my cardiologist said he wasnt concerned b.c when they happen they still showed as PVC's in the stress test on the treadmill, but I just feel like if I had an explanation i'd be so much more at east to start exercising again. Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 07-15-2009, 05:43 PM
Jeff's Avatar
Admin
Supporter
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,349
Journal Entries: 29
Jeff is on a distinguished road
Hi Casper -

I think I've had the full gamut of variance in intensity of my PVCs, from ones I feel in the middle of the night that are as soft as any other beat to ones I get either exercising or when I'm in front of the computer that feel quite a bit stronger.

The ones I get in front of the computer, I think they feel so strong because after an hour or so on the computer my heart rate will drop to the mid 50's, so the compensatory pause that comes after a PVC is also really long, which I would think means that my ventricles are pretty much at full capacity when they finally contract, making the beat a really strong one.

I imagine the increased blood volume is also the reason for the stronger PVCs when exercising. Sure, your heart's going fast, but it's pushing a lot of blood, too, so any pause would make your heart pretty full.

Do you get your exercise PVCs in a certain heart rate range or during a specific point in your workout? Also, how fast is your HR when exercising?
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 07-16-2009, 05:05 PM
Casper664's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wisconsin!
Posts: 73
Journal Entries: 1
Casper664 is on a distinguished road
it seems that after about 10 minutes is when they will start to appear...my heart rate really isn't too high...I think around 135? but sometimes ill get the strong onese after walking up a flight of stairs carrying laundry etc...and thats after about 1 min of short exertion...
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 07-16-2009, 06:33 PM
Jeff's Avatar
Admin
Supporter
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,349
Journal Entries: 29
Jeff is on a distinguished road
The big ones after taking a flight of stairs or a brief period of exertion are often called "transitional PVCs." They get this name because your heart and body are transitioning from a state of relative rest to one of activity and exertion. I almost always get a PVC about two steps after I get to the top of a flight of stairs. These transitional PVCs are as benign as any other.

If you think about what's going on inside you, it makes sense - about halfway up the stairs your body realizes - yikes! She's putting her body into gear - let's let loose some adrenaline so we can keep up. The adrenaline flows, excites some already excited heart cells, and bzzt! A skip.

The ones you have 10 minutes in sound like about the same thing. Try this once - if your normal warmup to full exertion is 5 minutes, allow yourself 10 minutes next time. A nice, slow ramp-up. It might make a difference, but it might not. Sometimes it does for me.

When I had my month-long event monitor on I was spending nearly every night on the treadmill, trying to force my heart into doing those bad things I told all the nice doctors were happening. Just about every time, when I got in the 130-140 bpm range, which was 15-20 minutes in, I'd get a few PVCs (3 or 4). At first I was hesitant to even record the PVCs, because I knew what they were and wasn't concerned about them (I've had ten years practice - that helps). But my cardiologist told me to not try to be the judge of what's important and what isn't - she told me to record everything and let her sort it out. So I did. And there was nothing in any of my rhythm strips that she was concerned about.

Hope that helps.

Jeff
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 07-17-2009, 10:12 AM
Casper664's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wisconsin!
Posts: 73
Journal Entries: 1
Casper664 is on a distinguished road
Thank you Jeff so much It really does help a lot I can't thank you enough for this site. Its so relieving to hear some of these posts and helps ease the stress and anxiety SOOO much. Thank you Thank you
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 08-08-2009, 09:35 PM
Neil's Avatar
Senior Member
Supporter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Stourport, uk
Posts: 124
Neil is on a distinguished road
Hi i am a 34 year old male and have been relativly fit all of my life, i dont drink or smoke or take tea or cofee. Since 30 i have suffered what my doc tells me are begnin ectopic heart beats. i have just about come to terms with that fact they are harmless just unpleasent although they still strees my out when i get them. however i have been getting a more powerful thud/kick in the chest when exercising. I went for a run the other day pulse at about 155/165 and had one enormous thud felt centre chest and throat, during that split second i was unable to take in a breath , no crushing pain or anything like that but it did stimulate massive anxiety. ironically the day previouse i had had an ECG stress test on a tredmill pulse to 155 not one ectopic beat and heart reate fine so the doc said it was safe to up the exercise. following the thud i attended the ER and bloods and ecgs were done all of which were ok which i assume rules out any heart damage therefore heart attack! I just really need to know if it is common for this to occur? my feeling is that it was a normal ectopic beat but with increased respiration (pleanty of deep breathing) and increased heart rate due to the running that in effect it has amplified the usual ectopic beat hence the massive thud. What are your thoughts (this type of situation/feeling has never happened and therefore never been captured before on a holter but ectopics have shown up on a holter) Is this likely to led to anything else? alot of sites say ectopics with excercise are dangerous and this has concerned me alot and i have stopped exercising. Your site seems to have a liilte more common sense approach so i welcome your views
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 08-08-2009, 11:05 PM
Jeff's Avatar
Admin
Supporter
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,349
Journal Entries: 29
Jeff is on a distinguished road
Hi Neil,

There seems to always be disagreement among medical experts about the importance of PVCs during exercise. There was a big study (29,000 people) that was evaluating frequent (defined as >7 PVCs per minute) PVCs before, during and after exercise, and only those experiencing frequent PVCs during the cool down period (and no other time) were more likely to have a dangerous cardiac event.

As for your situation - I don't know if fire crackers are allowed in the UK, but if they are, did it feel like one went off in your chest? I experienced that a few times back in January. Seemed perfectly timed with my heart beat, and was a very brief, surprising pain. One time it was a single beat, another it was two consecutive beats.

After some research (and the cardiologist not being sure that it was anything important), I believe what I experienced, and maybe what you experienced as well, was an esophageal spasm.

Like you, it really frightened me. But if we had the same thing, it looks like they may just be associated with stress, and should abate when the stress does.

Hope that helps.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 08-08-2009, 11:38 PM
Jeff's Avatar
Admin
Supporter
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,349
Journal Entries: 29
Jeff is on a distinguished road
I should add this - I had an event monitor last February, and after the first week I told her that I wasn't recording any of the PVCs, because I knew what those were and weren't worried about them. She told me that I should record everything, not try to decide what is important and what isn't, and then let her sort out what is what.

So I did. And while this only happened on two occasions, it did happen - I recorded an event that I thought was a simple PVC. I was laying in bed, not moving around, so there were no artifacts in the data. When I transmitted the data, the nurse told me that there was nothing recorded - just a normal heart rhythm. And this was from a guy who has had PVCs for ten+ years, and some days more than 15,000 in a day. And I still misjudged what was a PVC and what wasn't.

So it's possible that what you felt may not have been your heart, but was instead some other sort of muscle spasm. If your heart was going to hurt, it would hurt because of a lack of blood flow and the pain would not be so brief. And I've often heard that the pain people feel is a generalized pain, not one specific to the heart region.
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 08-09-2009, 06:04 PM
Neil's Avatar
Senior Member
Supporter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Stourport, uk
Posts: 124
Neil is on a distinguished road
Thanks Jeff. It has partly helped. It did feel like a fire craker as in an instantanious thud a little painfull but not crushing as described by a cardiac event. Stopping my breathing also for that second.I suppose it felt like my heart was about to burst out of my throat or if it hyperflexed (as if you have over extended a joint) you may have something about the esophegous as following the thud i brought up some acid for a while and later whilst in the ER i had a muscular pain in my back between my shoulder blades, simlar to a sore muscle pain.
The only thing that concerns me is that it occured after about 2 mailes of a run and just after i had picked up the pace to a fast run increasing brathing then slowing down again that was the moment it struck. Would this be classed as that cool down period? (worried).
My doc wants me to wear another monitor and try to recreate the symptom again. That terrifies me!!
the only thing i`ll say that helps is that my Grandfather bless him died earlier this year at the age of 94. he tells me that he suffered what he called a missed heart beat for 40 to 50 years
. He died following a hip OP and phneumonia!
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 08-09-2009, 07:05 PM
Jeff's Avatar
Admin
Supporter
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,349
Journal Entries: 29
Jeff is on a distinguished road
I'm not sure whether that could be classified as the recovery phase of exercise, as you were just slowing down a bit, not stopping, right? Also, when studies report on ectopics, they talk about frequency of those ectopics - once in awhile is not supposed to be a big deal, and since this is a one-off occurrence (so far, anyway), it wouldn't seem to be something a doctor would worry much about. In the study I referenced earlier, any # of PVCs less than 6 per minute during cooldown were not supposed to show an increased risk of anything.

And I know what you mean about not being able to breathe - I'm not sure if it stopped me from breathing, but it stopped me in my tracks as I was walking across a room. It was a sharp little twinge of pain that seemed timed perfectly with the heartbeat. At the time I was a full-on stress monkey, and had been visiting my doctor regularly to figure out some other unusual gastronomical symptoms. While the gastro issues weren't the original cause of the stress, they certainly added to it. Once the stress was mitigated, so were those pains, as well as a few others.

Re: your grandfather - those kinds of stories help to make the rest of us feel better about living to a ripe old age despite having skips and blips.

Are you under a lot of stress lately?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Replies Last Post
frequent pvc's and pac's concerneddad 3 07-13-2009 09:22 PM

The cat came back...
09-18-2014 by mjonis
Viewed 94 times

And it started...
08-21-2014 by Skipping_Heart
Viewed 240 times

just a sucky day
08-05-2014 by alwaysworried
Viewed 126 times

Learning to let go of the fear
08-04-2014 by DawnK
Viewed 183 times

Thanks for the Warm Welcome
05-27-2014 by Vikes88
Viewed 291 times